The bilingual drama Agamemnon, a co-production of the National Theater Company of China a

nd the National Theater of Greece, represents a refreshing innovation for Chinese theater lovers.

  The play by ancient Greek tragedian Aeschylus, often called the “father of tragedy”, is the first part of his only extant tr

ilogy. It is a story about patriarchy, matriarchy, revenge and justice. In the story, Agamemnon s

acrifices his daughter to win the Trojan War. After his triumphant return, the king is slain by his wife and her lover.

  Directed by Stathis Livathinos, artistic director of the NTG, Agamemnon embodies a pr

ofound cooperation between China and Greece. “To have a bilingual presentation of a play means yo

u hear two languages, two kinds of actors, two schools. Of course it’s a very big risk. But it’s better to go with a risk t

han with safety. Because I really believe the National Theater should always be the avant-garde,” he said.

  ”Agamemnon is a part of something bigger that doesn’t belong only to Greece. This

is a theatrical and artistic meeting of two civilizations on stage,” Livathinos added.

lirxb.cn

ause the camera must not be covered during the folding, while the battery is also thicker. Huawei Mate X looks better, but its display is not protected as well as that of Samsung Fold and faces higher risk of breaking should the phone be dropped.

The two share one thing in common, namely a high price — Both are rather expensive. The Samsu

ng Fold is priced at $1,980 while the Huawei Mate X is priced at 2,299 euros ($2,606). The high price will

quite seriously limit the marketing of the two products and make them the luxuries of rich people only.

According to our analysis and market forecasts, in 2019, the number of f

oldable smartphones and tablets sold globally might reach 900,000, which might do

uble in 2020. As a comparison, people globally bought 1.4 billion smartphones in 2018. In a word, unless its cost fall sh

arply, the market for foldable smartphones will be limited for the foreseeable future.

Yet both Huawei and Samsung have invested huge resources in the research, publicity, and mark

eting of foldable smartphones. There are two main causes for that. First, smartphones are already so

developed that there is hardly any new space for innovation. The iPhone 4 miracle of Steven Jobs can hardly be re

peated in the near future, so both companies need to show the world that they are innovating.

Second, foldable displays need special materials that are quite scarce i

n the market, so neither of the two companies can afford to wait for the other to rise. B

oth need to keep the market in a balance so as to ensure its own share of products.

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  ”Green Book” won best picture at the Oscars, marking the final twist on a night of historic firsts, filled with suspense until the final prize.

  Despite controversies surrounding the film, and many outspoken critics, the per

iod drama about race relations in the 1960s felt like a more conventional best-picture choi

ce than its two top rivals, both of which had to overcome key hurdles: “Black Panther” represented the fi

rst superhero movie to earn such recognition, while “Roma” not only would have been the first foreign-lan

guage winner, but was likely hobbled by those who still see its distributor, Netflix, as an upstart in the movie world.

  The Oscars compensated for a host-free ceremony with a nigh

t of breakthroughs, moving briskly through the categories in a concerted effort to sh

orten the run time, amid a night marked by greater inclusiveness and that spread the wealth among the nominees.

  Award voters extended honors to a number of blockbusters, including “Black Panther,” which

earned several technical awards; and “Bohemian Rhapsody,” the biography of Queen and the band’s fron

tman, Freddie Mercury, earned four Oscars — the most of any film — including Rami Malek’s first for the central role.

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  national security, and peace in Northern Ireland would be compromised in the case of a no-d

eal Brexit, and added the scenario would risk inflaming the nationalist sentiment in Scotland.

  ”Far from Brexit resulting in a newly independent United Kingdom, stepping boldly into t

he wider world, crashing out on March 29 would see us poorer, less secure and potentially splitting up,” they write.

  Rudd, Clark and Gauke also cautioned members of the European Research Gro

up (ERG), a Parliamentary alliance whose members advocate for a no-deal Brexit and have previously voted do

wn May’s deal, that their lack of cooperation would be responsible for a postponement in the Brexit process.

  ”It is time that many of our Conservative parliamentary colleagues in the ERG recognized that Parliament will stop a disastrous No Deal Brexit on Mar

ch 29. If that happens, they will have no one to blame but themselves for delaying Brexit,” they wrote.

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  said its troops had also repelled an attack Saturday morning by suspected militants on a security outpost in Geidam village in Yobe state.

  No one was injured, according to Col. Sagir Musa of the Nigeria army, who said the attempt would not affect voting in the area.

  ”The situation is calm and peaceful,” Musa said in a statement. “Peop

le have largely turned out to cast their votes without any hindrance.”

  The election delay has increased tensions in Nigeria, and there

have been instances of violence in the lead-up to the vote. The British and US governments hav

e warned they would deny visas to, and could prosecute, anyone found inciting violence during the election.

  Last week, a terror group with links to ISIS claimed responsibility for a deadly at

tack in Maiduguri on a motorcade carrying Kashim Shettima, the governor of Borno state.

  Shettima escaped unscathed. Isa Gusau, the governor’s media aide, told CNN on Thursday that the ambush killed three p

eople, although locals put the death toll much higher. The terror group claimed that 42 people died in the assault.

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  unity and the military over aid delivery near Gran Sabana, on the Brazil-Venezuela border, said the town’s mayor, Emilio Go

nzalez. He told CNN the military opened fire on an indigenous group trying to facilitate the passage of aid into Venezuela.

  Gonzalez said soldiers shot and killed a 34-year-old indigenous Venezuelan woman and injured 17 others.

  National Assembly member Americo De Grazia said on his official Twitter feed that two

people had died. The second victim was an indigenous man, according to De Grazia.

  Gonzalez said indigenous guards detained 27 Venezuelan military members. Venez

uela’s Ministry of Defense told CNN it had no information on the incident.

  Tensions escalate over aid

  Venezuelan opposition leader Juan Guaido, who invoked a constitutional provision last month to declare himself acting

president, condemned the incident in a tweet Friday, saying such acts by the military “will not go unpunished.”

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  children decided to go against his advice to discharge their mother with Alzheimer’s disease: “(The children) told me the patient is yours. We don’t have any money to spend on her.”

  ”I explained to the children that when she stays here, it means that her life expectancy is reduced by 80% … it means that she may have an infection and means the lady will die much sooner,” says Emami.Accompanied by her mother, 5-year-ol

d Dory visits Ali at work wearing a tutu skirt and a coat with leopard print. He carries her behind the bar where she pl

ays with empty juice dispensers. Later she settles on his lap and plays games on his smartphone.

  Trump admin pushes for tougher action on Iran, swipes at Europe

  It’s a break from her shuttling between home and the hospital, which she must visit at lea

st once a week. Sometimes the doctors determine that she has to stay in her hospital bed for sev

eral weeks. It’s a routine that will continue until she’s 18-years-old, her father says.

  But Ali says he’s dedicated to helping her have a normal life: “It doesn’t matter what Trump’s sanctions do, I’ll do whatever it takes to find her medication.”

  He puts a hand on his chest, puffing up his skinny frame. “I’ll even fly myself to get them for her. Whatever it takes.”

qianpadbe.com

  A Michelin-starred restaurant in the Spanish city of Valencia is at the center of a food poisoning outbreak that has killed one woman and affected 28 further diners.

  The 46-year-old victim died after eating a meal at Riff in the Mediterranean coast city. Regional health author

ities have also identified 28 more people that became ill after visiting the restaurant, according to a statement.

  The woman, who has not been identified, died in her home early Sunday morning. Her husband and 12-year-old son also suffered food poisoning but are now

in recovery, said authorities.All of the 29 victims of the outbreak had eaten at Riff between February 13 and 16.

  Food inspectors visited the restaurant on February 18 but did not find any explanat

ion for what could have contributed to the outbreak, reads the statement from the public health department.

  The inspectors took samples of food used in the tasting menu, which have been sent to Spain’s National Toxicology Institute for analysis.

www.qianpadag.com

  emerged online in late January. The news report — misidentified on You

Tube as dating from 1995 — shows Lorber, Lebow and Trump in discussion with Mo

scow’s then deputy mayor, Vladimir Resin, and his staff, with Geovanis looking on from the background.

  Blocked numbers and ‘dirt’ on Clinton

  Lorber has already been linked to the Senate investigation into Russian meddling in the 2016 elections. The New York Times n

amed him earlier this month as one of the Trump family associates who spoke with Donald Trump J

r. from blocked numbers around the time of a highly scrutinized 2016 meeting at Trump Tower in New York.

  That meeting was attended by top Trump campaign advisers –— Trump Jr., the Presid

ent’s son-in-law Jared Kushner, and Manafort — and Russian lawyer Natalia Veselnitskya, who had pr

omised dirt on Trump’s election opponent, Hillary Clinton. Lorber has not responded to multiple calls for comment.

www.gzbbaf.com

  On February 23, humanitarian aid will enter Venezuela one way or another,” the country’s self-declared president Juan Guaido d

eclared earlier this month. But not so fast — President Nicolas Maduro, who won reelection in a widely-criticized vote last year, has pr

omised to block the supplies, and organizations including the Red Cross and United Nations have refused to help.

  The slow advance of aid toward impoverished Venezuela has become a proxy measure of

the power struggle between its two rival presidents. At the same time, there is little doubt that the Ve

nezuelan people are in need of help. So why is it so hard to agree on aid?

  What is happening?

  Venezuela is dealing with the worst economic crisis in its history. One

in 10 Venezuelans are undernourished, and the economic crisis has triggered an exo

dus of at least three million people, according to the International Organization of Migration.

  Venezuela closes key maritime, air borders with neighbors amid growing aid crisis

  Guaido has thrown all his weight behind a “humanitarian channel” that would bring tons of mu

ch-needed aid from foreign countries into Venezuela. But the plan isn’t just benevolent — it’s als

o a direct jab at Maduro, who for years has denied that a humanitarian crisis was happening in Venezuela.

  ”The impact of the humanitarian aid is highly political,” admits Jua

n Miguel Matheus, an MP for the opposition. “Our first and primary goal is to provide relief for

the Venezuelan population, but after that, with this move we want to checkmate Maduro.

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